Bryan's Posts About Birdwatching

Flight Happens

May 18, 2013: A breakout day for flying things. It began on one of my guided bird walks to Berlin Pond: Virginia Rail at our feet. Yellow Warblers glowing above. Scarlet Tanager, in a naked white ash, fully framed in…

When It Rains Birds

AH, THE VERNAL DESIRE, the explosion of insects, the bustle of wings, the struggle for existence, the great rush north of migrating birds. In few places is it more dramatic than here along the shores of Lake Erie. Yeah, Lake…

Berlin Pond Birding Bonanza

An Osprey smacks the water and emerges with a bass struggling in its talons. Common Loons linger at a nest nearby. And warblers turn the trees into sparkling palettes. Another May morning at Berlin Pond. This year we’ll visit during…

Mob Mentality

The Black-capped Chickadee may be the perfect songbird. It is vocal and approachable, inquisitive and dependable. Even the casual birdwatcher finds in the chickadee a neighbor, a friend, an entertainer, a mobster. A mobster? Well, not exactly Al Capone. But…

April Fireworks

Most of the time, a male Ruby-crowned Kinglet is a fraud with feathers. When he appears, neither ruby nor kingly, you may wonder how he got his name. Just keep watching …

The Vermont Independence Birding Map

There is virtue in slowing down, staying put. Birders with limited physical mobility know this well. Here’s a map for them. These are Vermont birding sites with access for folks who might use a cane, walker or wheelchair. Accessibility at…

Mid-Priced Spotting Scopes

IT MUST BE TOUGH BEING AN INVESTMENT BANKER or hedge fund manager. So many pricey spotting scopes; so little time. Swarovski, Leica or Kowa? How does the one percent decide? Life is so unfair for them. But if you’re among the…

Buying Binoculars

It is a monumental decision in the life of any birdwatcher. At stake is nothing less than the pleasure you get in the company of birds. So here is some wisdom on buying and using binoculars. Magnification and Light First…

Migration’s Misfits

Pick your favorite sign of spring: squirrels mating, mud oozing, maples flowering. Mine is a vulture soaring. Change in the air is a naked, ruddy head gliding in on big wings. But more than being a vernal messenger, the Turkey Vulture is an avian iconoclast. It topples simplistic notions of migration.