Bryan's Posts About Birdwatching

Got Gulls?

They are among the most successful birds on Earth, living from polar regions to parking lots, along shorelines or at sewage ponds. They can be elegant or brutish, ambitious or lazy. And even as they pose for us in plain sight, they can be notoriously hard to identify — but not any more. Getting Gulls, my new workshop, debuts Thursday, December 1 at 6:30PM in the Essex High School auditorium in Essex, Vermont.

Got Geese?

Now that Snow Geese are returning to Vermont, track the migration with my 2016 Snow Goose Scoop. It’s one-stop shopping for the great white goose show.

Into the Wild (and Away from the Screen)

I now get to go outside and play — er, I mean work. My field season, as a consulting biologist and educator, launches like migrating warblers this week, which means you’ll find me less often here on the blog.

Ghosts and Tiny Treasures — My Essay for Aeon

Ten years ago, I walked into the swamps of Arkansas to find a ghost — and perhaps some redemption for wildlife … and for us.

Learn Birds and Insects in my Spring and Summer Field Seminars

My “Summer School” for nature features three courses this year. We begin with Better Birdwatching in May, continue with Butterflies and Moths in June, and wrap up the semester with Dragonflies and Damselflies before Independence Day.

Life in Flight in the Rio Grande Valley

A sampling of life on the wing here in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Many of these butterflies, in profile, are no bigger than a nickle or so (but they are indeed priceless).

A Wren and a Revelation (and a Threaded Pipe)

From the canyon came a wren during the Gila River Christmas Bird count. But not just any wren. This is the wren of vertical walls, the wren of rocky dreams, the wren with a cascading serenade, here at my cabin in New Mexico.

Get Goosed This Weekend

If you haven’t seen the snows of autumn, this weekend should be a good bet for getting goosed. In the December warmth, thousands of Snow Geese continue to flock and fly in Vermont and New York

Gratitude for Gulls

This may be the perfect gull. Cosmopolitan, versatile and elegant in flight, Bonaparte’s Gull is a gull for people who don’t like gulls. It slices the frigid air like a swallow. It drifts and swoops and swirls before me here on the Niagara River as the giant falls roar in the distance.

A Blue Ross’s Goose

Might I have an exceedingly rare blue-morph Ross’s Goose here? I’ve been ruminating on this bird for nearly a year with no decision. Well, I had actually made up my mind on this bird, but I like to question my assumptions from time to time. In this case, it offers you a lesson in bird identification.

Vermont’s First Snowy Owl — and Other Snow (Birds) in your Forecast

The Arctic has come visiting. Vermont’s first reported Snowy Owl of the season showed up yesterday, November 12, at the Whiting Library in Addison. We’ve got news of other white birds as well.

Backgrounder: Where Are the Snow Geese?

For three decades, as autumn leaves blazed and swirled across Vermont, an annual rite of fall was the Champlain Valley “snowstorm.” Snow Geese in migration, sometimes more than 10,000 in day, filled the skies and covered fields in a honking blanket of geese. But here’s the forecast for the fall of 2015: the blizzard ain’t happening anymore. Instead we’ve got flurries.