Bryan's Blog

The Adventures of a Field Biologist and Boy Explorer

Sex and Light

On the shortest day of the year, when most of us turn toward the light, I seek out creatures of the dark: moths mating in the cold.

Birdwatching’s Carbon Problem

A moral question for birdwatchers and others who enjoy — and simultaneously harm — nature on a warming planet.

My Extra Hour

Time flies — but I have a plan to beat the clock on Sunday when we dial back an hour. I’ll save mine for nature. Here’s an essay for The Boston Globe.

The World on the Wing of a Butterfly

From arctic bogs to southwestern deserts — and lots of places in between — I offer you transcendence on the wing of a tiny butterfly.

A Fading Serenade

My essay, published Sunday in The Boston Globe, about aging as a field biologist — and finding new ways to save wildlife and wild places on a damaged planet.

A Flower’s Reproductive Antics

For two hours we sat beside a trail and did little more than observe how a stately flower reproduces. Our singular task was in part an act of rebellion.

Light from Darkness

By the thousands they flew into our lives: Moths sporting zigzags and polka dots. Moths adorned in carmine, azure and gold. Here’s my report on lessons from National Moth Week.

BE THE FLAME AND THE MOTH

During National Moth Week, discover and enjoy the shock-and-awe diversity in your own backyard. Just leave the porch light on for a few hours.

The Spineless Speak Up

Three caterpillars I encountered this month illustrate the raw force of insects on Planet Earth.

Podcast: Birding and Conversation

My morning birding with Erica Heilman, a dear friend and the creator of Rumble Strip. It’s a podcast. So as we watched Yellow Warblers glow, Erica and I talked about birds and about finding our place in the world.

Watching Swallows

Finding respite from suburbia, in suburbia, within a flock of swallows on the wing. Oh, and some friendly advice for over-eager birdwatchers and photographers.

Insects for Birders

Insects for Birders

Join me April 2 for inspiration and practical advice on turning your binoculars toward butterflies, dragonflies, fireflies, tiger beetles and other glittering insects, which E. O. Wilson calls the “little things that run the world.”