Bryan's Blog

The Adventures of a Field Biologist and Boy Explorer

My Extra Hour in Nature

When the rest of America turns back its clocks this weekend, I’ll begin my plan to bend time and claim one wild and precious hour.

Snowy Owl Alert

Snowy Owls are now turning up in New England, Quebec, Ontario, Michigan and across central Canadian provinces. I’ll be tracking the migration for you this winter on the Snowy Owl Scoop.

Butterflies and Joy

Two hundred orange butterflies in a meadow of purple wildflowers — next to the ocean. It reminds me to slow down, lose the gadgets and find the joy.

The Black Bear

Guest author Grace Glynn, a field naturalist at the University of Vermont, encounters a black bear here in Vermont. A tree brings them together: American Beech.

The Snows of Autumn

With a dusting of snow here in Vermont this morning, here’s your reminder that I’m now tracking the Snow Goose and Snowy Owl migrations for you this autumn.

Monhegan Migration Report No. 3

Migrate or die. Such is the fate of Monarchs here on Monhegan Island. But where do these Monarchs — 12 miles out to sea in the Gulf of Maine — spend the winter? I report from this Atlantic outpost.

Monhegan Migration Report No. 2

Cape May Warblers outnumbered Yellow-rumped Warblers here on Monhegan Island yesterday. Well, maybe it’s because I’ve learned how not to look at Yellow-rumped Warblers.

Monhegan Migration Report No. 1

Today on Monhegan Island, 12 miles out to sea off the Maine coast, the prairie dropped in for a visit. Dickcissels, lots of them, far from their heartland in the Great Plains, descended from the skies at dawn.

Self Portraits with Insects

Every now and then, I find myself in a photograph of a flying insect. (Okay, these are accidental self portraits.) In this case, I’m photobombing a dragonfly and a butterfly.

Naked in the Lake

The largest freshwater lake on the planet is the stage for our canoe trip on Lake Superior, where ancient rock and crystalline water conspire for some of the most beautiful paddling anywhere. The place is also in my DNA.

The Extinction of Meaning

One of the most imperiled animals in North America isn’t big and furry like a polar bear. It has incited no eco-wars like those over the gray wolf or the spotted owl. Instead it’s a tiny butterfly that I’ve watched dance across the prairie.

The Post’s Fake News on Dragonflies

The Washington Post published an article crediting rainfall this summer for elevated dragonfly activity. Fake news! Here’s my letter to the editor.