Bryan's Posts About Birds

Announcing: The Viral Spring

Your field guide to nature during the pandemic, with regular updates as we practice “distant socializing” (including in the wilds of our homes and back yards).

The Naked Signs of Spring

Reporting from the American South, I bring you vultures, violets and hints of springtime.

What’s Next: Green Alert

The slow-motion spring across the northern forest now moves into a season of diversity, abundance and flight.

When Songbirds Fall to Earth

Delivered from the fog, the grace and irony of tired warblers feeding at my feet on Monhegan Island, Maine.

The Falcon and the Flycatcher

Here on Monhegan Island, a flycatcher dies in a falcon’s grip, and then falls gracefully to earth. Oh, and Scarlet Tanagers — lots and lots of Scarlet Tanagers.

YELLOW ALERT

The gradual outbreak of spring across northern forests this year — more reluctant than most any I can remember — now brings us to peak yellow.

What’s Next: Warblers

I am grateful that the leaves are taking their time arriving this spring. That’s because the warblers are coming. Well, actually, the warblers are already here. So please see them — now.

Sex and Mayhem in a Pond

If you ever needed proof that females bear the worst when it comes to reproduction, here it is: Wood Frog amplexus. This is not murder and mayhem. It is mayhem and mating. We’ve got the video.

What’s Next – Earth Day Edition

An Earth Day Weekend celebration of what’s flying or simply growing here in the American Southeast, plus what’s next in the north.

What’s Next – Early April

Although snow still covers the hills of my home state of Vermont, I’m here in the Southeast to assure you that fifty shades of red are in your future before much of the green breaks out.

What’s Next – Late March

Despite today’s snowstorm here in northern New England, the first wave of migrating birds arrived with the warmth last week. Here’s your latest edition of What’s Next this spring.

What’s Next – Mid March

The birds and butterflies in your future this mid March as warm air brings about new flight in our woodlands and backyards.