Bryan's Posts About Butterflies

Montpelier Goes Wild

Spring Salamander and Summer Azure. Lesser Purple-fringed Orchid and Greater Celandine. Pineapple-Weed and Chocolate Tube Slime Mold. They were all among the more than a thousand living things we discovered here in Montpelier this past weekend.

Check Out These Checkerspots

Thaddeus William Harris might have liked this series of images, including a mating pair of Harris’ Checkerspots and the female’s eggs on her host plant, Flat-topped Aster.

Insects: In the Air and On the Air (with me) Today

Tune in and bug out with me and Kent McFarland today on Vermont Public Radio’s annual insect show.

The Little Blue That Couldn’t

Here’s a case of unrequited affection between a pair of little butterflies known as Silvery Blues (Glaucopsyche lygdamus).

Life Expressed in Flight, Poetry and Music

At long last, we here in the north will launch into spring next week. I’ll celebrate with two events. I hope to see you at either one — or both. You’ll encounter butterflies, birds, poetry and music.

My Outtake Scene from Sex, Lies and Butterflies

My outtake from the PBS special Sex, Lies and Butterflies. It lives online.

Getting the Blues

In the case of little blue butterflies known as azures, you are what you eat. Here’s my updated explainer on the blue sparkles of April.

Your Best Field Guides Aren’t Apps

What’s true for movies is true for nature apps: the book is better. If you really want to learn nature, anything from bogs to bumblebees, get an actual book. Here’s my buyer’s guide.

The Eclipse on the Wing of a Butterfly

The Heavens — and a total solar eclipse — reside on the wing of a butterfly.

Fly or Die: Painted Ladies on the Move

Now passing you by is one of the planet’s great events — an epic migration like no other. Painted Lady, the world’s most widespread butterfly, is on the move. We’ve been seeing them bigtime here in New England the past few weeks.

Insect Alerts

News from the frontiers of blue butterflies and burgundy damselflies.

April Clickbait

If nature blogs were as rhapsodic as BuzzFeed and other clickbait, they might read something like these.