Bryan's Posts About Insects

What’s Next – Late March

Despite today’s snowstorm here in northern New England, the first wave of migrating birds arrived with the warmth last week. Here’s your latest edition of What’s Next this spring.

What’s Next – Mid March

The birds and butterflies in your future this mid March as warm air brings about new flight in our woodlands and backyards.

Extinction and other Matters of Life and Death and Insects

Perspectives on the “insect apocalypse” and what we might do about it.

Insects and Us: Our Shared Fate

Now that the fate of insects is being described in apocalyptic terms, I’ll be helping to make some sense of it all live on Thursday, February 21, at noon on Vermont Public Radio. 

The Poetry of Seashells

From my outpost by the sea in North Carolina, here are 10 reasons (with photos) for you to find joy in the poetry of seashells.

The Year in Flight

From tropical rainforests to northern bogs, a year of flying things on display for you in a span of 60 seconds.

What’s This? No. 32

What’s wrong with this puzzle? Lots. Among the 79 butterflies depicted in this otherwise lovely portrait, I’ve found no fewer than 14 errors.

Butterflies and Joy

Two hundred orange butterflies in a meadow of purple wildflowers — next to the ocean. It reminds me to slow down, lose the gadgets and find the joy.

Monhegan Migration Report No. 3

Migrate or die. Such is the fate of Monarchs here on Monhegan Island. But where do these Monarchs — 12 miles out to sea in the Gulf of Maine — spend the winter? I report from this Atlantic outpost.

Self Portraits with Insects

Every now and then, I find myself in a photograph of a flying insect. (Okay, these are accidental self portraits.) In this case, I’m photobombing a dragonfly and a butterfly.

The Extinction of Meaning

One of the most imperiled animals in North America isn’t big and furry like a polar bear. It has incited no eco-wars like those over the gray wolf or the spotted owl. Instead it’s a tiny butterfly that I’ve watched dance across the prairie.

The Post’s Fake News on Dragonflies

The Washington Post published an article crediting rainfall this summer for elevated dragonfly activity. Fake news! Here’s my letter to the editor.