Bryan's Posts About Insects

Dirty Insect Image No. 4: Mustard Whites

In my continuing series of Dirty Insect Images, this pair of Mustard Whites (Pieris napi) spent about 10 minutes copulating on a red maple seedling yesterday.

Montpelier Wild No. 4: April Fireworks

In Monday’s heat the butterflies awoke. During our walk around Berlin Pond, where we noted 32 bird species, Ruth and I saw the year’s first butterflies: Mourning Cloak and Eastern Comma. They were also 2013’s last butterflies. These two species…

Subarctic Bluets (Coenagrion interrogatum)

Dirty Insect Image No. 3

Valentine’s Day greetings from a pair of Subarctic Bluets (Coenagrion interrogatum) making more Subarctic Bluets at a pond in central Saskatchewan last summer.

Life Among the Dead

Here in one of our great museum collections, I find warmth, diversity, shock, awe and innumerable stories of life on Earth.

The Year in Flight

They dwell on northern bogs and at ponds, and do what damselflies do: fly around, kill things and have sex. To casual observers, this pair of Subarctic Bluets (Coenagrion interrogatum) may appear no different than many other little blue damselflies…

The Troubling Buzz on Bees

From my colleagues at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies: More than one-quarter of Vermont’s bumble bee species, which are vital crop pollinators, have either vanished or are in serious decline, according to a new investigation from the Vermont Center for…

The Last Butterfly

By Bryan on November 5, 2013 From spring through fall, they flickered and fluttered among us – tiny flashes of red, orange, yellow and blue floating above hayfields and dancing in flower gardens: Spring Azures, Great Spangled Fritillaries, Red Admirals,…

Zombie Aspen Leaves

Yellow and brown and down to earth, they might appear dead. But they are not quite dead. They are the undead: zombie aspen leaves.

Monhegan Report No. 2: The Other Migration

On the breath of Boreas, the Greek god of the north wind, migrants blew onto Monhegan Island Tuesday morning. No fallout, but we were busy with some of the place-name warblers: Tennessee, Nashville, Cape May. South winds Wednesday produced a quiet morning.

Dirty Insect Image No. 2

It spends most of its life as an egg attached to the underside of a cranberry leaf in a single spruce bog. But during its week-or-so fling as a tiny adult, the Bog Copper (Lycaena epixanthe), about the size of…

Monarchs Wednesday in Brookfield

Dirty Insect Image No. 1

By Bryan on August 25, 2013 Perhaps this will be a new blog feature: insects, um, er, you know, making more insects. I’ve got scores of these. I’ll begin with this copulating pair of White-faced Meadowhawks (Sympetrum obtrusum), which I…