Bryan's Posts About Dragonflies

A Thousand-Year-Old Dragonfly

Here in the Chihuahuan Desert, where water is scarce and sacred, I encounter an ancient dragonfly. But what dragonfly species is it? Is it even a dragonfly? I report; you decide.

Freshly Published: The Dragonflies of Vermont

Long after we’re gone, when insects rule the world, dragonflies will rule all insects. In the meantime, here’s your new manual to dragonflies of Vermont. I’m coauthor with my pal and colleague Dr. Mike Blust.

Life in Flight at Maine’s Eagle Hill Institute

From a classic field station and center for learning Down East in Maine, here’s a report on butterflies, moths, dragonflies, damselflies, orchids, lichens and some of the people who love them.

In the Rainforest: Pleasure and Peril Among the Unknown

Spend a lifetime in the rainforest and you will learn but a fraction of its secrets. In Costa Rica, the drama of life on Earth plays out on a thousand stages in every direction. So here’s a report on the beauty of the tropics, its poisons and pleasures, and the pitfalls of knowledge. Oh, there’s also a slide show.

Going Outside for ‘Flight Season’

Now begins my grand season of flight. I’m pulling the plug and going outside to chase birds and insects as much as possible until September. Maybe I’ll see you out there.

Discover Dragonflies During My Summer Seminar

Pick any scene from the drama of life on Earth: birth, growth, beauty, courtship, reproduction, betrayal, murder. Find them all expressed in the lives of dragonflies. Shakespeare could have written the script for these insects. And now you can join the drama with my summer dragonfly and damselfly seminar near the Maine coast.

What’s This? No. 21

My next What’s This? nature challenge was along the Gila River in southwestern New Mexico last week. I won’t reveal whether this is animal, vegetable, mineral or other

The Last Dragonfly

Even after our first hard frost and our last soft serve, after you’ve raked your leaves and mounted your snow tires, after the warblers have abandoned us for the tropics and you yourself have abandoned notions of warmth, and even after this cold political season – even then a dragonfly of summer remains.

A Halloween Dragon

Nothing scary here – unless you’re a mosquito or some other small flying insect. Halloween Pennants (Celithemis eponina), which hunt and eat insects, range across the eastern US. They perch at the tips of low vegetation and twirl in the…

The Spineless on Monhegan

On north winds Wednesday morning the songbirds came to Monhegan – and then they left. Our gentle rain of migrants included newly arrived Yellow-throated Vireo, Blue-winged Warbler (thanks to Tony Vazzano) and Cerulean Warbler, an extraordinary bird for the island. Blue Grosbeak, Lark Sparrow and Clay-colored Sparrow, the usual Monhegan oddballs, entertained the besotted birders.

Going Nuclear for Dragonflies

On a crisp, sunny day in September, after what was probably a typical summer for a dragonfly, a Common Green Darner took off and began to migrate south. As it cruised past the summit of Vermont’s Mt. Philo, with Lake Champlain below and the Adirondacks off in the distance, the dragonfly crossed paths with a Merlin.

Zebras and Us

When I saw this dragonfly, I wet my pants. Okay, I was standing in Lewis Creek, so that’s actually how I wet my pants. But this dragonfly makes me euphoric. And I’m not entirely sure why. So I’m developing a theory on wildlife and aesthetics.