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— Bryan

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Bloodroot in Montpelier, Vermont.

Yes, a plant is far more than its flowers. But today I photographed the sexy parts of a few spring ephemeral wildflowers here in Vermont. These are the plants, often in calcium-rich hardwoods, that bloom before the leaves break out in the forest canopy. While I was shooting Hepatica flowers, a Milbert’s Tortoiseshell butterfly (which overwintered as an adult) stop by for a visit (which you’ll see in the final shot below).

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Hepatica in Plainfield, Vermont.

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Beaked Hazelnut (pistillate flower) in Marshfield, Vermont.

Spring Beauties in Plainfield, Vermont.

Spring Beauties in Plainfield, Vermont.

A Milbert's Tortoiseshell visits Hepatica in Plainfield, Vermont.

A Milbert’s Tortoiseshell, tattered at the ednges, visits Hepatica in Plainfield, Vermont.

7 comments
  1. Bernadette says:

    I saw this butterfly on Coltsfoot in my backyard in Hyde Park three weeks ago. It was beautiful!! I had no idea they overwintered in Vt.

  2. Michele Clark says:

    Thanks, Bryan. Walking on the railroad bed in Plainfield yesterday there were trillium leafing out all over. No flowers yet but coming. Also a few leafing out in our area on Lower Road.

  3. Barb says:

    amazing that the butterfly made it through such a rough winter. I have been looking for beaked hazelnut without success. Any suggestions where they are hiding from me?

  4. Patti Haynes says:

    Bryan, those posies leave me weak in the knees….It reminds me of a Mother’s Day wild flower walk we took with you about 25 years ago.
    thanks 🙂
    Patti Haynes

  5. Kristen Lindquist says:

    Beautiful! All I’ve seen here in Midcoast Maine so far is Coltsfoot and very tightly budded Trailing Arbutus.

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